Saginaw Bay Fishing Report 10/22/2015

boy-holding-perchSaginaw Bay windy conditions made fishing more difficult. A few perch were caught inside the marina at Eagle Bay. Small perch were caught in the Pine River. Some are still getting out to the Saganing Bar and the Pinconning Bar but all they found was duck hunters. A walleye was caught in the Hot Ponds. Shore anglers and those in small boats caught small perch on minnows and worms near Quanicassee. At Sebewaing, the cuts were slow. Anglers caught small perch. Caseville was quiet.

  • Saginaw River was producing the odd walleye. Earlier in the week, a couple limit catches were reported by those jigging minnows. This is a good place to fish if the Bay is not accessible.
  • Au Gres Area had perch up to one half mile straight out in 20 to 30 feet. Catch rates were fair. Bass anglers caught fish. Those trolling near Whitestone Point caught a few walleye.

Outer Saginaw Bay:

Oscoda pier fishing is very slow and angler pressure has dropped off except for a few fishing late in the evening.

  • Au Sable River there have been reports of a few salmon caught up river and at the dam when floating spawn or casting spoons and spinners. As the weather cools and rain increases the flow, anglers should start to see steelhead.

Tawas Area pier anglers caught a few small perch and mostly sublegal pike inside the pier. A few walleye were caught by those casting rapalas in the evening on the outside.

  • Tawas River: salmon run is done. No fish were seen.

Fishing Tip: Lake whitefish, not just for commercial anglers!

http://alex-cool.com/lake-whitefish-imagesAlthough extremely important to Great Lakes commercial fishers, lake whitefish are becoming more and more popular with recreational anglers throughout Michigan. But you really have to know how to catch this delicious species!

The lake whitefish has a small, exceedingly delicate mouth and is confined to dining on insects, freshwater shrimp, small fish and fish eggs, and bottom organisms. Most feeding takes place on or near lake-bottoms. Keep that in mind when selecting your bait.

If you’re interested in staying inland and looking for lake whitefish, stick with deep, clear-water lakes. If you’re interested in heading to the Great Lakes they can most often be found in deep water, either on or near the bottom.